3 Ways to Help Your Teens Build Good Credit

When your teen finally takes the big leap and moves out of the house, they’re going to need a solid credit score for a lot of life steps: renting an apartment, getting a loan or finding a good deal on insurance.

For that reason, it’s important that teens build up their credit scores before they move out. There are a few ways you can prepare them for this in the years leading up to graduation.

  1. Make sure they have a checking account and debit card to go along with it
    Getting your teen started with their own bank account is a significant step in building their credit score without ditching their safety net. A teenager under 18 years old can still sign up for a debit card; they just need a co-signer. Since you are co-signing on the card, your personal account will be linked to your teen’s in case of an overdraft. With this checking account and debit card, you should also teach your teens the importance of managing money well.
  1. Teach them the credit card basics
    Credit cards are a bit more complex than debit cards, so it’s important to sit down your teen and help them understand the basics. Signing them up for their own credit card is a bigger step than signing up for a debit card, but it’s an additional step that will help boost their credit score — assuming they pay the bills on time and in full. U.S. News & World Report contributor Amelia Granger says that the most critical skill a teen can learn is to pay their bills in full, even if that means starting with a smaller credit limit. Make sure you are monitoring your teen’s bills to confirm they’re not damaging their credit score rather than building a good foundation for the years ahead.

 

  1. Help them open a Secured Credit Card
    A Secured Credit Card is the perfect card to teach your teen how to properly manage money. It does this by not allowing them to use the money they don’t have, instead locking in a minimum amount of $500 they must use as if it were borrowed money from the bank. This card will help them improve their credit score and after a year they will be able to apply to a regular credit card.

Responsible money management is tough to practice if you learn it late in life. Your kids will be much better off by teaching them good financial practices.


Shopping Online Vs. In-Person

With the advent and spread of smartphone technology, entrusting your money to an online bank has become an increasingly popular alternative to the traditional experience. Traditional banks, however, still offer several distinct advantages that the online experience cannot provide, including in-person customer service when you have questions or concerns.

How do you decide which type of bank to use? Here are a few things to consider about your transactions.

Getting cash

If you use cash on a regular basis, make sure to consider the locations and accessibility of in-network ATMs before choosing your bank. Choosing a local bank or credit union means you should have good access to multiple ATMs, and many banks will reimburse you for fees incurred by using other ATMs.

Online banks don’t typically have ATMs of their own, which means you are more likely to pay a fee to withdraw your cash. These fees usually run a few dollars per withdrawal, but can often be frustrating since you are paying to take out your own money. This isn’t always the case, though. According to Business Insider’s Megan Durisin, some online banks will provide you with compensation for your fees. However, there is usually a cap on how much they will reimburse you per month.

Making deposits

When choosing your bank, you also want to consider how you will deposit money into your account. While both online and traditional banks usually allow direct deposits from your employer, online banks have several restrictions when it comes to other deposits.

At a traditional bank, you can deposit cash, checks, money orders and more. Simply walk into your bank and speak with a representative about your deposit. If you make a significant number of deposits, especially with checks or cash, traditional banking is a convenient option.

With online banking, your deposit options are a bit limited. Depending on your bank, you might be able to digitally deposit a check, but there are usually limitations on how much you can digitally deposit in one day. If your check exceeds that limit, you’ll have to mail it in. To deposit cash to an online bank account, you may have to purchase a money order and mail that in, as well. “You might have to pay a small fee for the money order,” explains Spencer Tierney, a contributor at NerdWallet. “For amounts larger than $1,000, you may have to spring for a cashier’s check at a bank.”

Customer service

Many online banks provide great customer service, including online live chats and call centers. But for some, speaking face to face is an important part of creating a trusting relationship with your financial institution, and it is a service that Durisin notes can only be offered by a traditional brick-and-mortar bank.

Choosing your bank is a personal decision that should be based on services that are most important to you and your lifestyle. Speak with a representative at either a traditional or an online bank to learn more.

 


Credit Check

How to Remove Credit Report Errors

Credit Check

What do you do when you spot an innacuracy on your credit report? Take steps to dispute it. Because of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, cleaning up your own credit report is usually quick and easy. Credit reporting agencies (often called credit bureaus) should only report accurate and current information.

Step one – Obtain your credit reports
To know exactly what is happening with your credit, check the reports from all the major credit bureaus – TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian. The information on each report may vary because not all creditors report to every bureau. You may receive a free report from each company once per year from Annual Credit Report Request Service, or you may obtain them from the bureaus directly for a fee.

 

Step two – Know what can be removed
You can’t rid every negative notation from your file – credit bureaus are obligated to report all credit and debt information as long as it is correct and timely. So what can be removed?

  • Wrong information. If the report lists incorrect information, such as an account you never opened, someone else’s name, or a judgment for a lawsuit you were never a part of, you can have it permanently purged from your record.
  • Duplicate information. While an account can sometimes show up multiple times, you may want to have your report list it just once. This can prevent lenders from believing you have more debt or credit problems than you actually do.
  • Old, negative information. In most cases, negative information, even when accurate, won’t haunt you forever. Your credit report may reflect lawsuits, judgments, liens, foreclosures, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy (from the filing date), late payments, and charged-off accounts for seven years. Chapter 7 bankruptcy will be evident for ten years from the date of filing. Child support arrearage and default notations for student loans, though, can be reported until satisfied.

Step three – Dispute inaccuracies
If you do spot errors or items that should have aged off your report, it is time to take action:

  • File the dispute with the bureau. You may make your dispute on the company’s website, over the phone, or by mail. In all cases you’ll have to provide your personal identification and a description of what is wrong, and what the correct information is. If you have any documents that support your case (such as copies of cashed checks that confirm you paid an account), include those as well.
  • Wait 30 days. After you file your dispute, the bureau has 30 days to investigate the matter, and a dispute notation will show up on your report. The creditor will have this time to verify the information, and if they can’t prove it’s accurate, the bureau will stop reporting it. When the bureau completes the investigation they will send you a written report covering what they found, and an updated copy of your credit report if it resulted in any change.

In the majority of cases, removing inaccuracies is that simple. However, if the investigation results in no change, contact the creditor by phone and/or mail and explain why the information is incorrect and that you want them to report the accurate information. Include copies of supporting documents (a statement showing a zero balance, for example), if you have them. The creditor may not continue to report unproven information.

Finally, if the situation still doesn’t get resolved to your satisfaction (or if the negative information is correct but you have a good reason for why it happened), consider writing a letter of explanation to add to your report. In one hundred words or less, you can explain your side of a credit problem. Write the note clearly, include supportive facts, and send it to the bureaus to be attached to your report. This “100-word statement” could make a positive difference to whoever is reading the report.


Credit Report

6 Confusing Things About Your Credit Report

If you’re not used to reading them, credit reports can make about as much sense as a restaurant menu printed in a foreign language. At least in a restaurant, you can point to what someone else is having. But if you don’t know how to read your credit file, you could make mistakes that could lead to your financial life being harder than it needs to be.

Here are some common misinterpretations people make about their credit reports and how to avoid them.

  1. They have too many student loans listed for me
    When student loans are listed on credit reports, they are often broken up into individual loans for each semester you took out a loan. Of course, you still want to make sure all the loans are yours, but don’t be surprised if you see a lot of loans listed under the same provider.
  2. I must be a victim of ID theft because someone else’s name is on my report
    When companies like Equifax, Experian and TransUnion compile your information, they look to gather up all financial information that is being reported for you. In doing so, they may accidentally confuse you with someone with a similar name or other bit of identifying information. This can result in that person’s name, address, date of birth, Social Security number, etc. being mistakenly listed on your credit report. You can always have this kind of information removed from your credit report by disputing the information at the website of the bureau that is listing the information. You can access the website for the individual bureaus listed above by simply adding “.com” onto the name of the credit reporting agency.
  3. I paid that collection account, it shouldn’t be on my report anymore
    Collection agencies aren’t required to remove a collections account from your credit reports once you have paid it. All they are required to do is list that the account has been satisfied. Negative accounts like these stay on your credit report for seven years from when the account first went delinquent with the original creditor, whether they are paid or not.
  4. My credit score is missing
    The credit reports we are all entitled to by federal law – available at www.annualcreditreport.com or by calling 877.322.8228 – do not come with a credit score. There is currently no law that automatically provides everyone with a free score. FICO is the company that provides the score most commonly used by lenders. You can purchase a score from them at www.myfico.com.
  5. My date of birth and address are part of lending decisions
    When you access your credit reports, you will see that some of your personal information is listed in addition to your financial data. For example, the report may list where you live, when you were born, and who you have worked for recently, among other things. You needn’t be worried that this is being used against you when a potential lender is looking at your reports, though. It is illegal for a lender to use age or address when making lending decisions and these pieces of information are not calculated into your FICO credit score.
  6. All these inquiries count against my score
    When someone other than you looks at your credit report, it results in what is called an “inquiry” being put on your credit report. If you’ve ever looked at credit reports, you may know that there can be a whole lot of them listed at any one time. Keep in mind that the only inquiries that are ever factored into your credit score are ones that happened in the past year (even though they stay on your credit report for 2 years) and the ones that were for the purpose of you applying for credit or financing some other type of financial contract. The other types of inquiries are not counted against you.

Establish good credit

5 Ways to Establish Credit

Establish good credit
Establish good credit today!

When it comes to getting a credit card, qualifying is actually one of the easiest parts of the process. Establishing a positive credit record, however, requires dedication and patience.

Whether you are new to credit or are trying to “clean up” past mistakes to reestablish a favorable record, you may encounter a frustrating paradox: you must have and use credit to create a credit history, yet many financial institutions are reluctant to extend credit to someone without an established record. But don’t despair – there are several good remedies for both situations.

A Secured Card
An excellent start is a secured credit card. You are granted a credit line based on a percentage of a cash deposit you make to your financial institution. Because deposits are usually low, so too will be your credit limit. Application and annual fees for secured cards are often higher then those associated with unsecured credit cards.

The Retailer’s Card
Consider a local retailer’s credit card. Their criteria is often less rigorous than larger credit issuers. Be sure they subscribe to the major credit reporting agencies though – if not, you won’t be establishing a credit history.

A Co-Signer
Another option is having someone with a positive credit record co-sign an account for you. This requires a great deal of trust on the part of the co-signer – if you fail to pay, he or she is responsible. You could end up jeopardizing a relationship as well as a credit record.

Review Your Credit Report
Finally, if you have damaged credit, you might need to rectify the past as you’re building your future. Paying old debts and correcting errors on your credit report as soon as possible might be the way to go.

Pay off Your Debts
Once you have a credit line, establish a good history by using it responsibly. Keep balances low, always pay on time, don’t pursue unnecessary credit, and stick with a few good credit instruments of various types.