Improve your small business!

How Can You Keep Your Small Business Competitive?

If you are a small business owner you must prepare for everything. For the not so profitable months of the year and for the months your product has more demand. You must also make smart investments, keep your small business trendy, and always have long-term and short-term goals. Keeping your small business competitive can be a little challenging. The following tips may help you improve your small business strategies.

  1. Know the meaning of the word “but”
    This seems like an odd tip but this small word can be very powerful. For example, if you charge more than your competitors’ chances are you get a few complaints. The short-term solution can be to change your product prices for a period of time, but that doesn’t solve the actual problem. Plus, if customers are going to you for products (even while complaining) it means it is worth buying. With this in mind, this is how the word “but” can help you. First, acknowledge your high prices, then follow with the word “but” and add a valuable statement.“Yes, it is true our prices are high but we use high quality products that can help save money for our customers in the long run.”By doing this, you are sending the message that you care enough about the quality of your product and to help your customers save money. It gives you a valid reason to keep your prices high.
  2. Invest in advertising
    Paying top price for a product or service can be justified by its benefits. People won’t choose your business unless you invest in getting the word out there.
    Invest on a website with good content and SEO strategies. This will serve as social proof for new customers and it will create a digital convenience for your old customers.
  3. Research the market constantly
    Competitive research should be a part of your business planning, and it should continue until your business is stable. The easiest way to do this now is online. Research competitive businesses near you until you can find the differentiating factors and you can promote your business more efficiently.
  4. Offer products and services as needed
    It is okay to offer a variety of products that can do the same thing and value at different prices. You can offer your premium product and have a backup to become more competitive in case it might be too pricey. It is better to retain a customer who has the potential of returning and purchasing more.Owning your business can be rewarding and challenging at the same time. Continue to improve your business and see how successful it can be.


Credit Check

How to Remove Credit Report Errors

Credit Check
Improve your credit score!

What do you do when you spot an innacuracy on your credit report? Take steps to dispute it. Because of the Fair Credit Reporting Act, cleaning up your own credit report is usually quick and easy. Credit reporting agencies (often called credit bureaus) should only report accurate and current information.

Step one – Obtain your credit reports
To know exactly what is happening with your credit, check the reports from all the major credit bureaus – TransUnion, Equifax, and Experian. The information on each report may vary because not all creditors report to every bureau. You may receive a free report from each company once per year from Annual Credit Report Request Service, or you may obtain them from the bureaus directly for a fee.

 

Step two – Know what can be removed
You can’t rid every negative notation from your file – credit bureaus are obligated to report all credit and debt information as long as it is correct and timely. So what can be removed?

  • Wrong information. If the report lists incorrect information, such as an account you never opened, someone else’s name, or a judgment for a lawsuit you were never a part of, you can have it permanently purged from your record.
  • Duplicate information. While an account can sometimes show up multiple times, you may want to have your report list it just once. This can prevent lenders from believing you have more debt or credit problems than you actually do.
  • Old, negative information. In most cases, negative information, even when accurate, won’t haunt you forever. Your credit report may reflect lawsuits, judgments, liens, foreclosures, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy (from the filing date), late payments, and charged-off accounts for seven years. Chapter 7 bankruptcy will be evident for ten years from the date of filing. Child support arrearage and default notations for student loans, though, can be reported until satisfied.

Step three – Dispute inaccuracies
If you do spot errors or items that should have aged off your report, it is time to take action:

  • File the dispute with the bureau. You may make your dispute on the company’s website, over the phone, or by mail. In all cases you’ll have to provide your personal identification and a description of what is wrong, and what the correct information is. If you have any documents that support your case (such as copies of cashed checks that confirm you paid an account), include those as well.
  • Wait 30 days. After you file your dispute, the bureau has 30 days to investigate the matter, and a dispute notation will show up on your report. The creditor will have this time to verify the information, and if they can’t prove it’s accurate, the bureau will stop reporting it. When the bureau completes the investigation they will send you a written report covering what they found, and an updated copy of your credit report if it resulted in any change.

In the majority of cases, removing inaccuracies is that simple. However, if the investigation results in no change, contact the creditor by phone and/or mail and explain why the information is incorrect and that you want them to report the accurate information. Include copies of supporting documents (a statement showing a zero balance, for example), if you have them. The creditor may not continue to report unproven information.

Finally, if the situation still doesn’t get resolved to your satisfaction (or if the negative information is correct but you have a good reason for why it happened), consider writing a letter of explanation to add to your report. In one hundred words or less, you can explain your side of a credit problem. Write the note clearly, include supportive facts, and send it to the bureaus to be attached to your report. This “100-word statement” could make a positive difference to whoever is reading the report.


Declutter and Save!

How Can Decluttering Save You Money?

What is the current state of your closet? Is it stuffed to the brim with clothes, shoes, suitcases, cleaning supplies, your high school yearbook textbook, etc., or can you do cartwheels in there? Is every horizontal surface covered in piles and piles of stuff or is almost like a guest room?

A clutter-filled house can lead to increased entertainment costs; you don’t want your friends to see the mess (or are sick of seeing it yourself), so you go out. Duplication is another way that clutter can cost you. Have you ever spent money on something you already had because you had no idea where it was, and did not want to spend hours looking for it?

If the thought of actually having to go through all your stuff makes you sweat, don’t worry. Here are some tips that can help make the decluttering process as painless as possible:

Do a little at a time: You are less likely to get discouraged and give up if you set a series of small goals spread out over time instead of trying to clean up the whole house at once.

Take a picture of sentimental items: Do you have some items that you never use but can’t throw out because of their sentimental value (such as the doll you bought for your daughter who is now 25)? Taking a picture can make it easier to part with. You will have a reminder even if it’s no longer collecting dust in your closet.

Donate or sell: While some of your items may be worn out and only welcomed by the trash bin, there may be many things you can sell to a consignment or thrift store, or donate to charity. Think of your cleaning as putting money in your pocket or helping others, instead of just a chore.

Use the “one in, one out” rule: After you go through all that effort to get rid of what you don’t need, you probably don’t want the house to revert back to its former messy state a few months from now. A good solution is to get rid of something whenever you purchase something new. You buy a new t-shirt at the mall—when you get home, go into the drawers and get rid of an old one.

By taking the time to declutter, you’ll be cleaning all the way to the bank.