Money-Saving Pandemic Tips

Money-Saving Pandemic Tips

Find ways to cut back

Think about the money you spend weekly on lattes, take-out meals, Amazon buys, etc. Cut some or all of those things back and put that extra cash in your saving’s account during this time. It may not seem like a lot up front, but $30-$50 a week adds up. You’ll be surprised how much your savings can jump up with those small, frequent deposits.

Pay down your outstanding debts

Many people are taking advantage of credit card payment deferrals, which is great your income has been halted or reduced tremendously. But if you are still able to make payments, definitely do so, even if in small amounts. Working on paying down your credit card bills and outstanding debts will free up your expenses, and ultimately put more money in your pocket, which can then be added to your saving’s fund.

Utilize that budget!

Get serious about laying out all your expenses each paycheck with a budget. That way you’ll not only know where your money is going, but you’ll see how much you’re allotting for spending and saving. Budgets help you get a better handle on your money and prevent you from overspending.

Have multiple streams of income

If you’re surviving off of a reduced stream of income or stimulus payments, just think about the additional money you could add to your saving’s fund by creating another stream. Dig deep into those talents and hobbies of yours and see if there are any you could get paid for.

A lady budgeting

Make the Most of a Reduced Paycheck

Don't worry you will get through this!

Don't stress out!

Bubbles burst, the economy falters, companies downsize, and personal disasters happen which can result in a reduced paycheck. Perpetual salary growth or even maintenance is simply not guaranteed. However, by adopting the right tools and attitude, you can make the most of a reduced paycheck and not just survive, but thrive.

 

Determine whether your situation is temporary or permanent

If you fully expect to be back to your full salary soon, you may only have to adjust to lessened cash flow for a limited time. But before you tap into your reserves (and retirement savings, home equity, cash value life insurance, etc.) it would be wise to behave as if the salary reduction is long-term. Cut down on spending now. Securing your old income may take longer than you think.

If you do not expect to make as much money as you once did, you may be experiencing anxiety, which is normal. You may be panicking about the practical matters to contend with as well, such as how you will pay your bills. Adopting a systematic approach and devising a plan will help you manage the anxiety.

 

Recognize that your salary is not you

This is a deceptively obvious statement. Of course your salary is not you. But many people’s self esteem directly corresponds with how much money they make—the higher the income, the more important they feel. If your mood declines when your income drops, make every effort to dispel the attitude that financial wealth equals worth. It does not, nor does having an abundance of money guarantee happiness. Think back to when you were making more money then you do now. Were you genuinely happier, or did you just have the ability to buy more?

 

Seize the day

Hardship can hone skills and challenge entrenched ideas. Perhaps you worked in the high-tech field because the money was good, but that is not where your passion (or even perhaps talent) truly is. Consider this your opportunity to discover what you really want out of life. After all, if you are going to dedicate forty or more hours a week to your job, it should be something you love. Or at least like.

If you are currently unemployed or are working fewer hours, use this “extra” time wisely. Your options are as varied and abundant as your desires. Consider taking a class—one that will boost future earning potential or for pure pleasure. Write that book, paint the kitchen, start an exercise routine. Or just relax.

 

Analyze your expenses

When cash is copious, it is easy to spend arbitrarily. However, when the salary that sustained such a lifestyle is gone or drastically reduced, its time to take a good look at what you need to spend your money on, not what you can. Prioritize expenses now, and identify which bills take precedence. Mortgage versus car payment? Credit cards versus utilities? Analyze the ramifications of missing or not paying each. If you need help deciding, contact a financial counselor for help.

 

Develop a spending plan.

 

It will help you to discern between those expenses you can and cannot live without. If you find there is simply not enough money to support your necessities, much less your desires, at the very least you now know how much you will require from your next job. If expensive dinners are now a thing of the past, relish in the delights of a cheap pizza, or making cold cuts stretch with lots of lettuce. Enjoy and appreciate the things you may have begun to take for granted.

 

Remember: credit is not supplementary income

When money is tight, credit cards can take on an unusually seductive glow. However, a $40,000 line of credit is not a bonus in disguise, no matter how you much you wish it was. If you use credit to maintain the lifestyle you’ve grown accustomed to, it won’t be long before you “hit the wall”. Without an income to support repaying the balance in full every month, you’ll be paying in installments. Interest rates on unsecured credit is not cheap, and if you fall behind by 60 days, the rates will likely skyrocket. Late and over limit fees will add to an increasingly daunting balance. And soon you’ll be wishing you could return all the merchandise you bought and the meals you ate just so you don’t have to open another statement and look at those big, scary numbers. Credit cards are not designed to be emergency savings accounts.

 

Develop a plan

To thwart procrastination, write down what you want to achieve during this time. Be specific: include names of people you need to speak to and proposed accomplishment dates for each task. Update and refer to it regularly. Apathy’s enemy is a detailed and well-thought-out plan.

 

Go forward

Get professional assistance, talk to friends, and find others who are in like circumstances. It is too easy to think you are alone in this—support is key. Vent to those who can empathize; ask for help from those who can assist. Shock, shame, and anger are normal and feeling these emotions is expected. But by adopting a positive attitude and taking pragmatic steps, you can adapt to a reduced income, and achieve a financially stable future.

 

 

Blog Credit: https://www.balancepro.org/resources/articles/how-to-make-the-most-of-a-reduced-paycheck/


A couple purchasing a new car at a dealership

Tips to Save You Thousands on a New Car

Surviving the car dealership

Be Educated!

Whether you’re buying a new or used car, there are certain things to keep in mind when making a purchase. Unless you are a natural-born haggler, you might be a little uncomfortable or uneducated as to how to get the lowest price. A lower price means a lower monthly payment, and who doesn’t like saving money?

Research the Market Value

Just like any other purchase, you want to know what the vehicle is worth. There are many resources and websites available for consumers to check how much a car is realistically worth. Checking on this before going to the dealership will give you peace of mind knowing you’re getting a fair deal. You can assess the value of the car by going to sites like Kelley Blue Book or Edmunds. Both sites will help you find the average price per model in your area.

Don’t become too invested in the deal

You need to be ready to walk away from the deal if it’s not adding up. Make sure you keep a clear head and know when to say, “no thanks” and move on. Don’t get attached to a particular car, because in reality, there are thousands to choose from. Saying no and moving on may be a result of the dealer you are speaking to as well. Many are overly pushy and confusing, resulting in a bad customer experience. They may promise one thing, then turn around and take it back. Pay close attention to what they say and take notes if you have to. Auto Advisors are a great tool to use because they help people buy cars all the time. They know what to look out for and how to get the best deal.

Walk into the dealership knowing your out-of-door price

The out-of-door price is the price that you want to walk out with, which includes all fees, taxes, and other costs that you pay. Make sure this reflects the market value that you researched. Go into the dealership with a firm price and then talk the salesperson down. The salesperson wants to make a sale, so if you’re firm and don’t get too set on buying the car that same day, the salesperson will many times settle for your price.

Don’t get sucked into the extras

Here are some common add-ons that the dealership will try to get you to purchase to make it seem like you’re getting an added benefit.

  • Nitrogen in your tires – This is only useful for racing; otherwise, you likely will not notice a difference in your car’s performance or wear.
  • Theft Protection – These packages vary, but most new cars come with a built-in alarm system that will do the trick. There is no need for an advanced system.
  • Rear-seat Entertainment Systems – These are a complete waste of money. Ten years ago, it was a different story, but currently you can purchase a tablet for a fraction of what a rear-seat system would cost.

In conclusion, you need to be prepared and informed when purchasing a vehicle. Going to a dealership underprepared will most likely result in a poor deal that you walk away from unsatisfied. If haggling isn’t your thing, consider using an Auto Advisor. It’s their job to make sure you get the best price. They work with dealerships thousands of times a year, so dealers want to give them the best price possible in order to keep getting their business. You can learn more about our free auto advisors by clicking here.


Woman with money on desk

Your Stimulus Check and How to Use It

Suggestions on How to Manage the Money

Everything will be fine!

The government will be sending financial relief checks to millions of Americans. If you’re expecting to receive this relief, we want to help you with some ideas on how to manage that money.

Establish a plan and take care of your immediate needs

Before you spend any of the money, you need to make a plan and budget. Make sure you have food, rent, bills and any other necessities. These should be your biggest priority and are what many will be using the money for. Once your basic necessities are taken care of, you can allocate money to other things.

Pay off debt

This is a perfect time to pay off high interest credit cards or loans that are racking up your extra funds each month. The average American has $8,000 of credit card debt with an APR around 22%. Once you pay this off, or pay a portion of it, you will have more money for necessities when you’re not paying that high interest fee. If your debt is paid off and you have the ability to save this or put it into an interest-earning checking, savings, or money market account, you could get ahead on your savings goals. Whatever you decide to do, make sure you make a smart financial decision.

Add to or start an emergency fund

A good rule to follow is to have 6 months of expenses saved for. This fund should be easy to access and pull from when needed. For many people, this fund could be in use right now with times being as challenging as they are. For others, this would be a great time to add to it and to create an extra buffer for when things aren’t going as planned. The Coronavirus is a perfect example as to why this emergency fund is so important to have.

Help the community

If you’re fortunate enough and willing to, the community could use your help. There are many people that are struggling to buy supplies and stay afloat. Consider donating to trusted sources such as the World Health Organization, the American Red Cross, and various other nonprofits. You can also check with your local government to see if there are any nonprofits that are directly assisting your community.

We're in this together!

Everyone will have a different plan as to how they are going to use the relief deposits. Figure out what works best for your situation but make sure you stick to a budget. Along with being financially responsible, we need to remain positive and support our community. We are all in this together and will get come out of this stronger than ever!


Frustrated man with head on table and paper all around him

How to Survive a Layoff

Surviving a Layoff

Everything will be fine!

Surviving a layoff can be tough and demoralizing, but there are plenty of strategies to get you through it. Many times, layoffs can be caused by things that are out of your control such as recessions, mergers, budget cuts, etc. These are unfortunate circumstance but are many times completely unavoidable. The only thing you can do is pick yourself up and divert your focus to finding new opportunities. Listed below are 9 items that you should keep in mind when you’re laid off.

  1. Make sure you’re receiving everything that was promised to you. For example, if you’re promised a certain amount of paid vacation days and sick days, check your final paycheck to make sure it’s all there.
  2. Don’t panic! You may even want to take a few days off to relax and clear your mind before you make any decisions. Becoming overly panicked and worried will only stress you out more resulting in poor choices.
  3. Review your company’s policies. Figure out how to file for unemployment if that’s what you decide to do, and make sure to check how long your company-paid health insurance will be in effect. These are immensely important to understand incase there is an emergency.
  4. Make sure to look over your budget and make adjustments. There are many ways to cut costs when you really need to, so revisit and make changes to your monthly expenses. This might be as simple as cutting on grocery expenses. Click here for some tips on how to lower your monthly grocery expenses.
  5. Update your resume! You should continuously be updating your resume even when you’re employed, but make sure you have a current resume to give to prospective employers.
  6. Assess your goals. Are they the same as they were before you were laid off? If they aren’t, make sure your future plan is clear and attainable.
  7. Start applying for jobs! There are many online portals that you can use! For example, Indeed and LinkedIn are great tools that you can use to find jobs.
  8. Your family will always want the best for you. If your family sees you struggling and offers to help, swallow your pride and accept it! There is no shame in needing a little extra help when things go bad.
  9. Don’t get discouraged! It could take some time to find a new job, but you’ll eventually get that offer! Who knows, the layoff could lead to much bigger and better things.

 


Lady looking at her phone while grocery shopping.

Grocery Shop Like a Pro!

Shop and Save!

Don't spend more than you have to! Find out how!

There are a ton of ways that you can save on food every month. The obvious one that people always mention is to not eat out as much. Not eating out will save you a load of money, but here are 12 uncommon ways to save when grocery shopping.

  1. Don’t go shopping hungry. If you do, you’ll want to buy anything and everything!
  2. Make a list before going and STICK to what’s on it.
  3. Shop for seasonal items. Many times, they are fresher and cheaper.
  4. You don’t need brand named food items. Look for generic/store brand items such as those found on this website.
  5. Buy in bulk. It may cost a bit more upfront, but it will end up being way cheaper than buying smaller sizes.
  6. Shop from different stores even if it’s a little inconvenient, because certain items might be cheaper. For example, many items from Aldi are cheaper than items from Publix.
  7. YOU DON’T NEED THAT SALE ITEM. Unless you regularly use it, don’t buy it just because it’s on sale. Many times, these items go unused and are thrown away.
  8. There is absolutely no need to buy precut fruits and vegetables. The markup on those neat bundles of fruits and vegetables will eat a hole through your wallet. (Take it from someone who worked in produce, the cleanliness is often lacking as well!)
  9. Try going to non-grocery stores for certain items. Walmart offers many of the same brands as grocery stores, but at a lower price.
  10. Download the store’s app to look for deals and savings.
  11. WARNING – MATH SKILLS REQUIRED! Make sure you’re getting the most bang for your buck by comparing unit pricing. Different brands might come in different sizes and companies are good at making their packaging look deceivingly big.
  12. Many will say to leave your credit card at home. This is a good choice if you have no self-control, but if you do, then use it to earn rewards! Why not get rewarded for spending your money?
  13. And for the last tip - DO NOT BUY PLASTIC WATER BOTTLES. Doing this not only saves you money, but also keeps our environment clean. The bottled water industry is a billion-dollar industry. The average 16 oz. water bottle costs consumers a dollar. If you drink four a day, you’re spending around $120 a month. Buy yourself a fancy water bottle and filter to save both your money and the environment!


Young woman relaxing on beach, ocean view, Vacation Outdoors Seascape Concept

Ways to Save on Your Next Vacation

Man relaxing on the beach

As the spring and summer months quickly approach, we are all looking forward to some much needed vacation time. There are typically two types of people when it comes to planning for a vacation. Read the following sceneries and honestly reflect on which one relates most to your approach.

Scenario 1:

You and your friends/family decide to take a sporadic vacation to Mexico during March. The timing works perfectly for everyone, so you buy your tickets at a high season price. As the date quickly approaches, you all have completely forgotten about planning or buying a hotel, so you scramble to find a bouge place to stay. You end up spending way more than you should have due to your lack of planning.

As your relaxing on the beach with friends and family, zero thought goes into what you purchase or where you swipe your card. By the end of the stay, you have racked up a $8,000 bill for your luxury 4-night stay. Was it worth it?

 

Scenario 2:

You and your friends/family decide to take a vacation together at some point during the year. Everyone sits down and searches for the cheapest times for tickets, hotels, etc. Once the perfect date is settled and hotels and flights are purchased at an offseason price, you decide to make a daily budget to follow.

On vacation, you closely monitor your spending and aren’t just whipping out your rewards credit card to exercise your wrist. On your budget, you’ve accounted for extra spending each day so even if some days are more expensive than others, you have the necessary funds for it. Once it’s time to leave, you have a $4000 bill on your rewards credit card, but have enough money in the bank to pay that off immediately due to your proper planning.

 

Some tips to prepare for your next vacation:

  1. Budget. BUDGET! The last thing you want to do after coming back from a relaxing stay at the Bellagio is worry about paying off a credit card that you don’t have the money for.
  2. Use a rewards credit card for purchases. There’s nothing wrong with putting everything on a credit card. As a matter of fact, it’s what you should be doing to avoid having your account compromised. Earn extra money, miles, or gifts by putting everything on your rewards credit card and then pay the balance off to avoid high interest charges.
  3. Book in advance and during offseason if possible. Scenario 1 and 2 stayed at the exact same place but paid completely different prices. Booking well in advance will relieve stress as well as get you the best price. It’s recommended to start planning your vacation a year in advance to give you plenty of time to budget and find tickets.

According to CheapAir.com 2018 Annual Airfare Study, they determined that you should book this far in advanced for the following seasons.

  • Winter: 62 days in advance
  • Spring: 90 days in advance
  • Summer: 47 days in advance
  • Fall: 69 days in advance
  1. Figure out local transportation. You can easily save money by checking if there are local trains, busses, Uber, Lyft, etc. Taking a taxi everywhere will cost you an arm and leg.


Girl holding cash

8 Reasons to Create and Stick to a Budget

50/20/30 Rule to Budgeting

Try to budget with the 50/20/30 rule. What this means is that 50% of your income after tax goes towards nondiscretionary things such as: rent, utilities, food, car payments, etc. Next, 20% of your income should go towards some kind of emergency fund. Experts recommend saving a minimum of 6 months’ worth of expenses. Finally comes the fun. 30% of your income can go towards discretionary items like going out to eat, vacations, clothes, and anything else that you want to buy. 

 

1. Peace of Mind

You won’t have to stress about running out of money halfway through the month. Budgeting properly will lay out your weekly/monthly expenses and tell you how much you can spend. You just need to make sure to follow your budget precisely.

2. Helps you prepare for emergencies

Having an emergency fund set up is crucial. You never know when something bad will happen and the last thing you want to do is take a loan or put it on a credit card. It could take years to pay off the loan or credit card, so budgeting for an emergency fund will allow you to handle whatever life throws at you.

3. Shows bad spending habits

Bad spending habits can be seen through budgeting. You might not realize that you spend $100 on Starbucks every month unless you establish a budget. Once you see a pattern, you can change your habits to save more money.

4. Motivation

When your financially stable and have a clear goal, you’re automatically more motivated. Having a budget motivates you to make more, save more, and spend less. Without this, you might notice yourself slacking in your professional life.

5. Indulge in your wants

With a budget, you can slowly save for things that you don’t necessarily need. It’s better than charging it to your credit card and then having to pay interest over several months. Budget accordingly and maybe cut out certain unneeded things out so you can reach your goal.

6. It can be as simple as you want!

Budgeting doesn’t have to be a super complex task. You don’t need a finance degree to make a simple spreadsheet or plan. There are many online budgeting tools that you simply input your expenses and income. Start your kids out on a budget when they are young so they grow up learning how to use it. The sooner you start, the better.

7. Helps you determine how much debt you can afford

Oddly enough, budgeting helps you figure out how much debt you can actually afford. For example, if you’re buying a new car it can help you determine how much you can spend on a car loan each month. This is important to figure out because imagine how bad it would be to buy a car that is too expensive for you to afford. This happens to a lot of people so budgeting properly will make sure that you can afford whatever you end up buying.

8. It’s fun!

Budgeting doesn’t have to be boring! You can set mini goals for how much you want to save and then reward yourself when you reach that goal. It isn’t always easy, but creating a flexible budget will help you enjoy a financially stress free life.


Multigenerational Family

Multigenerational Households

Generational Family

There are many reasons for multigenerational households. It can be cultural, economic situations, or if you have dependents. There can be a lot of benefits with a full house, but it also requires a lot more planning and has its own set of problems.  

 

Create a new budget 

With more people in a household, you will need to adjust your monthly budget accordingly. Figure out who will pay for what and create a budget based off that. The worst thing you can do is to go into a situation like this blindly and not have a solid plan. If your parents are dependent on you, then you should figure out their needed expenses. This will include doctor visits, medication, and any other special care they require. Being open with your parents about money is going to help tremendously with planning. It will help relieve stress and confusion about their money, making everyone feel confident about the overall finances of the household.  

 

Create an agreement 

Even though they are your family, it’s important to create an agreement for financial expectations. Creating a document laying out rules that are agreed upon will help avoid future conflicts. If there is ever a question about certain finances, it will be easy to pull up the document and look at what was originally discussed. Obviously, this isn’t a legal document, so changes can be made whenever a situation arises that warrants a revision.  

 

Have a conversation about extra spending 

Not all spending will be for necessities. Even your parents want to go out and have a good time, so creating a budget for that is important as well. Cutting expenses might not be needed for many families, so just developing a plan for fun activities will be a good way to create an environment where finances aren’t just a bummer to talk about.  

 

Have a plan for the future! 

Your month-to-month plan should be focused towards an even larger goal. Looking ahead will make sure that your long-term goals will be met. Don’t just focus on immediate needs because you might overlook needs that should have been accessed way earlier to plan for. Having the big picture in mind will alleviate stress for both parties involved.  


Holiday Budgeting

Successful Holiday Budgeting

Holiday Budgeting

Successful Holiday Budgeting Tips

With the holiday season approaching quickly, budgeting for those holiday gifts is going to be super important. Not only will you have your reoccurring monthly expenses, but now you need extra money saved to purchase gifts for your loved ones. Here are some tips on how to prepare.

 

 

Figure out your expenses and make a list

Make a list of all your normal monthly expenses and then add all the gifts you intend to buy. Obviously, the monthly expenses should be the top priority, so once you know how much that is you can estimate how much you are able to spend on gifts or events. It’s super important to stay within you budget because nothing is worse than coming out of the holiday season in debt.

 

Set a limit for how much you are going to spend

Once you have a list of all your expenses, make a limit for how much you can spend. Many people don’t make a limit and overspend on their credit cards. This is a great way to end up in debt and paying interest on those gifts. No matter how special the person might be, giving up your financial freedom isn’t worth it.

 

Sales are everywhere

Check out the sales that are happening near you! Stretching your dollar will help you get the most bang for your buck. Huge retailers typically have flash sales or holiday deals. Make sure to have a shopping plan of where you want to go so you can check to see when their deals are. The best way to stay caught up on deals is to sign up for email alerts. It will save you the hassle of looking online every day to figure out if they are having a sale.

 

Don’t use a high interest credit card

Many banks and retail stores will offer discounts if you sign up for their credit cards, but then hit you with high interest rates. Credit Unions will offer the lowest rates available and many times have 0% APR for 12 months. This could be super beneficial when it comes to spreading out the cost of the gifts. Another option would be to go cash-only shopping so you can be sure that you won’t end up in any debt.

 

The holiday season is a fun time to spend with friends and family. Budgeting will help make this holiday season affordable and stress-free if done correctly!